Ideal Life Vision

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Ideal Life Vision:

Ann Webb, the founder of the Ideal Life Vision system, says that “Creating Your Ideal Life Just Isn’t That Hard.” Her system requires you to know what you want, have daily focus, and implementing the system into your own life. That means, you have to actually live what you say.

Webb and her husband finished graduate school with tens of thousands of dollars in student loans and two young kids. Before graduating, her husband promised her that after graduation things would be different because she would be able to stay home with the kids and simply be a homemaker. Well, it didn’t unfold that way as her husband took an entry-level job making peanuts in the most expensive city in the country. So they began having to stretch every dollar.

Webb would invite their friends over to have brownies and play games frequently because they didn’t have the money to go out and pay for their entertainment. On one of these game nights, their friends decided they wanted milk with their brownies, so they went into the kitchen and helped themselves to the rest of the milk in the refrigerator. After they left, Webb broke down in tears because she knew her family would have to have milk on their cereal for the rest of the week because they couldn’t afford to buy any more milk.

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Webb’s dad called while they were still living this and invited them to come home for Christmas because he had two really great things he wanted to share with them. As soon as she walked in the door of her parents’ house in Salt Lake City, Utah, she said, “Okay dad WHAT are these two really cool ideas you have to tell me??” So her dad grabs a really cute Christmas bag that thing smells really really good and hands it to her. He explains to Webb that it is her mom’s wassail recipe and that the neighbors sold it at some craft shows in the month of November and made $30,000.

Webb’s dad goes on to explain that he wanted her and her husband to start selling it on the East Coast where they were living and see how it goes for them. That was idea number one. Webb pressed to know what his second idea was and he said, “Oh my gosh, I’ve hired myself a coach!” All she could think was, “Dad you are WAY too old to be playing sports.” But, he continued to excitedly explain that this coach had helped him write a vision or a creed of what his ideal life would be and had him write down his goals for the rest of his life. And then he was able to virtually accomplish all of the goals he had set for all of his life within an 18 month period. He paid his house off, made over $150,000 a year, and more. He said, “What I’m thinking is between this new goal setting method that I’ve learned about and this business idea, maybe you can get something going for yourself financially.”

She grabbed a notebook when she got home around New Year’s and started writing bullet points of her goals. She then remembered, “Oh yeah, my dad has a different idea.” She got the book he had given her and it said, “Write your goals first person, present tense, as if they had already happened.” She found it totally weird, but thought, “What do I have to lose?” When she got to the financial part she wrote, “I have a wassail business. By December 31, 1989 I make $20,000 selling 2,000 bags of wassail at six craft shows. And every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 1-3 in the afternoon I make the necessary phone calls and accomplish the tasks that I need to. And it feels incredible to be on top of things financially.”

Ideal Life Vision

The book suggests you do it in all areas of your life. She finished with about one and half pages typed of her life vision and simply thought she was done. But, she realized there was a part two and that it required her to record herself reading it out loud with Baroque music playing in the background. She about just about threw the book in the garbage can because it was just too weird, but she remembered that she had seen it work for her dad and she just needed to try it because she was desperate. She went to the library and checked out a tape recorder and some Baroque music tapes. She went into her bedroom to begin this step, but only about 40 seconds into it her kids run in the room screaming and fighting. So she has to rewind both tapes and try again. This time in the middle of her recording, the phone starts ringing. The next time, the tape broke. She said, “Anything that could go wrong, it did go wrong and 3 hours later I finally have my ten minute life vision recorded.”

The third step is just to listen to it. Webb listens to it for about three days really well but on the third day she gets to the part about making $20,000. She just scoffs and thinks to herself, “Yeah right you cannot do this.” She said she needed to get real and changed to 5,000 because that was “more realistic”. Except she didn’t want to try to re-record everything she just did and go through that entire process again. So she decided to just vocally say “5.000″ when the tape would get to that part. It worked well for another week or so.

She recalls a day she remembers well when she piles her babies into the car to head for the grocery store and she was day dreaming the whole time. She remembered getting to the grocery store and hearing the tape rewinding, but she didn’t remember listening to the tape. When she came home, she found the book that her dad had given her and on the back was the guys name and phone number and asked, “How can I accomplish my goals if I can’t even focus on them??” She was almost in tears even asking this and he started laughing! He said, “Honey, just trust me, It’s going to work.” and she said, “Do you promise?” He said, “I can’t guarantee anything, but I just hope that you keep listening to it.”

That year, Webb and her husband made about $19,700. She was ecstatic! Jokingly her husband told her to try putting another zero on her $20,000 goal. She couldn’t even fathom that kind of money! She settled for $100,000 and came up with a 5 page life vision. That year, they made $93-94,000 and 18 months later they had a $1,000,000 food business.


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